International Organisation for Knowledge Economy and Enterprise Development
IKED - International Organisation for Knowledge Economy and Enterprise Development

Activities

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..:: Lessons from Nordic experiences on trade and innovation for Latin America
The United Nations/Naciones Unidas Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) has coordinated work by an international network of organizations and experts to research lessons for Latin American countries from a specific set of relevant country experiences in the area of trade and innovation. The Latin American countries are under considerable pressure with regard to labour-intensive industries, reflecting sharpening competition from Asia and notably China. Their success in breeding more knowledge-based and high-value industries have so far met with limited success, however. The purpose of the ECLAC project has been to gain insights of practical relevance for Latin American countries in search of reform. It has particularly attempted to shed light on how stakeholder engagement can help facilitate effective implementation of needed reforms.

The IKED team, responsible for examining and communicating the experiences of the Nordic countries, shares the view that stakeholder involvement matters for building better conditions for enterprise development, innovation, business renewal, etc. At the same time, the IKED approach emphasizes the importance of healthy separation of responsibilities. Impediments to new ideas and innovation prevail in all economies and society partly because of the dominance of incumbents and vested interests, which do not voluntarily pave the way for newcomers. The resistance is often embedded in all sectors, including governments (ministries as well as public authorities), universities and academia, and business. Tight control and ability to intervene and exert control on other players is bound to be counterproductive. In effect, seemingly productive partnerships and coordination can easily hinder renewal depending on how it is exercised. The experience of the Nordic countries brings lessons both in regard to relations that can be productive to reform, and of what can be counterproductive. The Latin American context is plagued by specific internal conflicts while the room for action is limited by resource issues. The IKED findings were presented in a working group meeting in Seville, September 2007, and a conference in Santiago, January 2008.

Read also:
>> ECLAC study “Structural Change and Productivity Growth – 20 Years Later. Old problems, new opportunities”
>> Building Long Term Strategies and Public-Private Alliances for Export Development: The Finnish Case
>> Building Long-Term Strategies and Public-Private Alliances for Export Development: The Swedish Case

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